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The Tournaments and their Winners

ARGENTINA:

The Apertura and Clausura system is the format currently used by the Primera División Argentina. It was introduced for the 1990-1991 season.

The Argentine Primera has 20 teams, the season is divided into two tournaments each consisting of 19 games, one game against each opponent.

1990 – 1991 Controversy

The first season saw the two champions play a championship decider to determine the overall champions. Newell’s Old Boys beat Boca Juniors on penalties controversially denying Boca their first official league championship since 1981. The following season both the champions of the Apertura and the Clausura have been recognised as official champions.

1991-1992 Onwards

Between the 1991-92 season and the 1994-95 seasons, the league used the old two points for a win system. From the 1995-96 season AFA adopted the 3 points for a win system.

season Apertura champions Points Clausura champions Points
1991-92 River Plate 31 Newell’s Old Boys 32
1992-93 Boca Juniors 27 Vélez Sársfield 27
1993-94 River Plate 24 Independiente 26
1994-95 River Plate 31 San Lorenzo 30
1995-96 Vélez Sársfield 41 Vélez Sársfield 40
1996-97 River Plate 46 River Plate 41
1997-98 River Plate 45 Vélez Sársfield 46
1998-99 Boca Juniors 45 Boca Juniors 44
1999-00 River Plate 43 River Plate 42
2000-01 Boca Juniors 41 San Lorenzo 47
2001-02 Racing Club 42 River Plate 43
2002-03 Independiente 43 River Plate 43
2003-04 Boca Juniors 39 River Plate 40
2004-05 Newell’s Old Boys 36 Vélez Sársfield 39
2005-06 Boca Juniors 40 Boca Juniors 43
2006-07 Estudiantes de La Plata 44 San Lorenzo 45
2007-08 Lanús 38 River Plate 40
2008-09 Boca Juniors 39 Vélez Sársfield 40
2009-10 Banfield 41 Argentinos Juniors 41
2010-11 Estudiantes de La Plata 45 Vélez Sársfield 39

2011-12                        Boca Juniors

 Number of championships

Apertura

  • 7: Boca Juniors
  • 6: River Plate
  • 2: Estudiantes de La Plata
  • 1: Independiente
  • 1: Newell’s Old Boys
  • 1: Racing Club
  • 1: Vélez Sársfield
  • 1: Lanús
  • 1: Banfield
Clausura

  • 6: River Plate
  • 6: Vélez Sársfield
  • 3: San Lorenzo
  • 2: Boca Juniors
  • 1: Independiente
  • 1: Newell’s Old Boys
  • 1: Argentinos Juniors

Total championships

  • 12: River Plate
  • 9: Boca Juniors
  • 7: Vélez Sársfield
  • 3: San Lorenzo
  • 2: Independiente
  • 2: Newell’s Old Boys
  • 2: Estudiantes de La Plata
  • 1: Racing Club
  • 1: Lanús
  • 1: Banfield
  • 1: Argentinos Juniors

RELEGATION SYSTEM

  • The Argentine Primera División relegates the two teams with the lowest average points per match over a three year period, and teams placed 17th and 18th in the average points per match table play-off against the 3rd and 4th placed sides of that season’s Nacional B table. The 1st and 2nd placed teams in the Nacional B are directly promoted to Primera Division, without a play-off.

Argentina has no cup tournament!

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BRAZIL:

O BRASILEIRAO

The Campeonato Brasileiro de Clubes da Série A, popularly known as the Brasileirão, is a professional football league at the top of the Brazilian football league system held annually since 1959. Contested by twenty clubs, it operates a system of promotion and relegation with the Série B. The season runs from May to December of the same year, with teams playing 38 matches each, totalling 380 matches in the season. Due to sponsorship reasons, the league is known as the Brasileirão Petrobras.

Due to historical peculiarities and the large geographical size of the country, Brazil has a relatively short history of nation-wide football competitions. The modern Campeonato Brasileiro only started in 1971, supported by the military regime of the time and made easier by the advancements in civil aviation and air transport. Before the establishment of a national league the most prestigious football competitions in Brazil were the state leagues, notably the Campeonato Paulista and Campeonato Carioca state championships (the tournaments of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro states). Most state competitions have a much longer history than the national competition and, consequently, the various state leagues were considered more prestigious than the national league during the first years.

Since 1959, seventeen clubs have been crowned Brazilian football champions. With eight titles, the most successful clubs are Palmeiras and Santos. The current champions are Fluminense, who won the 2010 season.

History

Between 1959 and 1970, two national championships existed to provide Brazilian representatives to Copa Libertadores. These were the Taça Brasil (1959–1968) and the Torneio Roberto Gomes Pedrosa (1967–1970).

The current Campeonato Brasileiro was created in 1971 using the structure of Torneio Roberto Gomes Pedrosa. The system used until 1987 was similar to FIFA World Cup or UEFA Champions League: the best clubs of each State Championship were separated in several small groups. Then the best of each group played the play-offs. But every year some aspects of format, number of entrants and rules changed.

In 1979, all big clubs from São Paulo, except Palmeiras, withdrew from competition. They protested against the odd system of tier qualification which made their rivals, Palmeiras and Guarani, enter only in the final phase (due to them being previous-year finalists) and also asking for the same privileges. Indeed oddly enough, Guarani finished in the top 12 playing only 3 games and Palmeiras finished third despite playing only 5 games in a tournament with 96 entrants.

In 1984, Juventus, a small club from São Paulo, managed to qualify for the Série A. Participants of that year could be promoted from and relegated to Série B in the middle of the tournament. Juventus thus started the tournament in the premiership, was relegated in the middle of the tournament but eventually managed to clinch the Série B title. Despite this the team was not promoted to Série A in the following year and failed to qualify to it from the state championship.

In 1987 the 13 biggest clubs of Brazil founded an association called Clube dos 13, in order to make their own commercial arrangements without CBF’s mediation. As a result, these clubs broke up with CBF and organized their own parallel league called Copa União, which replaced the old system which classified the state champions for the national championship. Immediately FIFA intervened threatening clubs and National Team to ban them from participating in international competitions. So Clube dos 13 accept to make a competition with CBF but maintaining Copa União format. In the final of the championship a disagreement along the system resulted in two champions: Sport Recife, supported by CBF and the Justice, and Flamengo, supported by Club dos 13 and a great part of media. From 1988 to 2003 Copa União system continued to be used with some changes every year. On February 21st, 2011, CBF finally recognized Flamengo as the 1987 national champions, along with Sport Recife, which makes Flamengo, as of 2011, the one club to have won most Brazilian leagues (6), along with São Paulo.

In 1999, an averaging relegation system similar to the one used in the Primera División Argentina was adopted. The two clubs with the worst point results in the first stage of the two previous seasons were to be relegated. However, this system only lasted for a single season. During the first stage it was discovered that one player was registered with false documents. Due to this scandal CBF decided to punish the player’s team cancelling the games in which this player took part. Due to this, the average points of some clubs were changed so one club lost positions and was relegated. This club immediately sued CBF, so this institution was prevented to host 2000 Brasileirão. In light of this, Clube dos 13 organized the championship of that year.

Before 2003, the format of Série A changed almost every year. Since 2003, the Série A has been contested in a double round-robin format and the team with most points is declared champion. There is no final match, which is a very controversial subject. Prior to 2003, the Brazilian championship had traditionally been decided with some type of playoff format (most commonly the “Octagonal”, where the top 8 regular season teams comprise a single elimination tournament), rather than the European model of points accumulation over a season. Although some purists complain that this system lacks the dramatic scenes of playoffs and finals, the competition has so far shown to be well balanced, without a small number of clubs dominating the league, a phenomenon often found in many European leagues.

Eleven matches of the 2005 competition were annulled due to a match-fixing scandal and had to be replayed.

For the 2006 season, the number of contestants was reduced to 20 and CBF claims it to be the “definitive” format. In 2006, a limit on the number of foreign players was set, such that no team can have more than three foreign players on the field or on the bench in a single match. The seasons with the largest number of entrants of the competition were: 2000 (116 entrants), 1979 (94 entrants) and 1986 (80 entrants).

In 2010, CBF decided to declare the champions of the defuncts Taça Brasil and Torneio Roberto Gomes Pedrosa as Brazilian Champions, as are called the team that win the Série A.

Competition format

Twenty clubs compete in the Série A. Since the 2003 season, the league began using a double round-robin format as the competition format. Each team plays the other clubs twice, once at home and once away, for a total of 38 games. Teams receive three points for a win, one point for a draw, and zero for a loss. Teams are ranked by points, with the team with the most points at the end of the season crowned the champion. If teams are tied in points, wins then goal difference determine the ranking. The four lowest teams in the rankings are relegated to the Série B.

International qualification

The top four teams in rankings qualify for the following season’s Copa Libertadores. Teams ranked 1 to 3 enter in the Second Stage, with the team ranked 4 entering in the First Stage. The eight teams in the rankings qualify to the following season’s Copa Sudamericana, with all those teams entering in the Second Stage. Should any of the qualified teams win the Copa do Brasil in the same season, their berths are awarded to the next ranked teams.

List of Brazilian football champions

Taça Brasil (1959–1968)

Year Champion Runner-up Semifinalists Leading goalscorer(s)
1959 Bahia Santos Grêmio / Vasco da Gama Leo (Bahia; 8 goals)
1960 Palmeiras Fortaleza Fluminense / Santa Cruz Bececê (Fortaleza; 7 goals)
1961 Santos Bahia América / Náutico Pelé (Santos; 7 goals)
1962 Santos Botafogo Internacional / Sport Recife Coutinho (Santos; 7 goals)
1963 Santos Bahia Botafogo / Grêmio Pelé (Santos; 8 goals)
1964 Santos Flamengo Ceará / Palmeiras Gildo (Ceará; 7 goals)
Pelé (Santos; 7 goals)
1965 Santos Vasco da Gama Náutico / Palmeiras Alcindo (Grêmio); 10 goals)
1966 Cruzeiro Santos Fluminense / Náutico Bita (Náutico; 10 goals)
Toninho Guerreiro (Santos; 10 goals)
1967 Palmeiras Náutico Cruzeiro / Grêmio Chicletes (Treze; 9 goals)
1968 Botafogo Fortaleza Cruzeiro / Náutico Ferretti (Botafogo; 7 goals)

Torneio Roberto Gomes Pedrosa (1967–1970)

Year Champion Runner-up Third place Leading goalscorer(s)
1967 Palmeiras Internacional Corinthians Ademar Pantera (Flamengo; 15 goals)
César (Palmeiras; 15 goals)
1968 Santos Internacional Vasco da Gama Toninho Guerreiro (Santos; 18 goals)
1969 Palmeiras Cruzeiro Corinthians Edu (America; 14 goals)
1970 Fluminense Palmeiras Atlético Mineiro Tostão (Cruzeiro; 12 goals)

Campeonato Brasileiro Serie A (1971–Present)

Year Champion (title count) Runner-up Third place Leading goalscorer(s)
1971 Atlético Mineiro São Paulo Botafogo Dario (Atlético Mineiro; 15 goals)
1972 Palmeiras Botafogo Internacional Dario (Atlético Mineiro; 15 goals)
Pedro Rocha (São Paulo; 17 goals)
1973 Palmeiras São Paulo Cruzeiro Ramón (Santa Cruz; 21 goals)
1974 Vasco da Gama Cruzeiro Santos Roberto Dinamite (Vasco da Gama; 16 goals)
1975 Internacional Cruzeiro Fluminense Flávio (Internacional; 16 goals)
1976 Internacional Corinthians Atlético Mineiro Dario (Internacional; 16 goals)
1977 São Paulo Atlético Mineiro Operário Reinaldo (Atlético Mineiro; 28 goals)
1978 Guarani Palmeiras Internacional Paulinho (Vasco da Gama; 19 goals)
1979 Internacional Vasco da Gama Coritiba César (America; 13 goals)
1980 Flamengo Atlético Mineiro Internacional Zico (Flamengo; 21 goals)
1981 Grêmio São Paulo No third place awarded Nunes (Flamengo; 16 goals)
1982 Flamengo Grêmio No third place awarded Zico (Flamengo; 21 goals)
1983 Flamengo Santos No third place awarded Serginho (Santos; 22 goals)
1984 Fluminense Vasco da Gama No third place awarded Roberto Dinamite (Vasco da Gama; 16 goals)
1985 Coritiba Bangu No third place awarded Edmar (Guarani; 20 goals)
1986 São Paulo Guarani No third place awarded Careca (São Paulo; 25 goals)
1987 Sport Recife Guarani No third place awarded Müller (São Paulo; 10 goals)
1988 Bahia Internacional No third place awarded Nílson (Internacional; 15 goals)
1989 Vasco da Gama São Paulo No third place awarded Túlio (Goiás; 11 goals)
1990 Corinthians São Paulo No third place awarded Charles (Bahia; 11 goals)
1991 São Paulo Bragantino No third place awarded Paulinho McLaren (Santos; 15 goals)
1992 Flamengo Botafogo No third place awarded Bebeto (Vasco da Gama; 18 goals)
1993 Palmeiras Vitória No third place awarded Guga (Santos; 15 goals)
1994 Palmeiras Corinthians No third place awarded Amoroso (Guarani; 19 goals)
Túlio (Botafogo; 19 goals)
1995 Botafogo Santos No third place awarded Túlio (Botafogo; 12 goals)
1996 Grêmio Portuguesa No third place awarded Paulo Nunes (Grêmio; 16 goals)
Renaldo (Atlético Mineiro; 16 goals)
1997 Vasco da Gama Palmeiras No third place awarded Edmundo (Vasco da Gama; 29 goals)
1998 Corinthians Cruzeiro No third place awarded Viola (Santos; 21 goals)
1999 Corinthians Atlético Mineiro No third place awarded Guilherme (Atlético Mineiro; 28 goals)
2000 Vasco da Gama São Caetano No third place awarded Dill (Goiás; 20 goals)
Magno Alves (Fluminense; 20 goals)
Romário (Vasco da Gama; 20 goals)
2001 Atlético Paranaense São Caetano No third place awarded Romário (Vasco da Gama; 21 goals)
2002 Santos Corinthians No third place awarded Luís Fabiano (São Paulo; 19 goals)
Rodrigo Fabri (Grêmio; 19 goals)
2003 Cruzeiro Santos São Paulo Dimba (Goiás; 31 goals)
2004 Santos Atlético Paranaense São Paulo Washington (Atlético Paranaense; 34 goals)
2005 Corinthians Internacional Goiás Romário (Vasco da Gama; 22 goals)
2006 São Paulo Internacional Grêmio Souza (Goiás; 17 goals)
2007 São Paulo Santos Flamengo Josiel (Paraná; 20 goals)
2008 São Paulo Grêmio Cruzeiro Keirrison (Coritiba; 21 goals)
Kléber Pereira (Santos; 21 goals)
Washington (Fluminense; 21 goals)
2009 Flamengo Internacional São Paulo Adriano (Flamengo; 19 goals)
Diego Tardelli (Atlético Mineiro; 19 goals)
2010

2011

Fluminense

Corinthians

Cruzeiro

Vasco da Gama

Corinthians

Fluminense

Jonas (Grêmio; 23 goals)

Borges (Santos 22 goals)

 

Titles by club

Seventeen clubs are officially recognized to have been the Brazilian football champion.

Club Number of titles Titles
Palmeiras 8 Taças Brasil (1960, 1967); Torneio Roberto Gomes Pedrosa (1967; 1969); Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1972, 1973, 1993, 1994)
Santos 8 Taças Brasil (1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965); Torneio Roberto Gomes Pedrosa (1968); Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (2002, 2004)
São Paulo 6 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1977, 1986, 1991, 2006, 2007, 2008)
Flamengo 5 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1980, 1982, 1983, 1992, 2009)
Corinthians 5 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1990, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2011)
Vasco da Gama 4 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1974, 1989, 1997, 2000)
Fluminense 3 Torneio Roberto Gomes Pedrosa (1970); Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1984, 2010)
Internacional 3 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1975, 1976, 1979)
Cruzeiro 2 Taça Brasil (1966); Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (2003)
Grêmio 2 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1981, 1996)
Botafogo 2 Taça Brasil (1968); Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1995)
Bahia 2 Taça Brasil (1959); Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1988)
Atlético Paranaense 1 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (2001)
Sport Recife 1 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1987)
Coritiba 1 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1985)
Guarani 1 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1978)
Atlético Mineiro 1 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (1971)

Titles by state

Seventeen clubs have been the champion, from a total of seven states. São Paulo accounts for half of all national championships won, winning 27 out of 54 official competitions.

State Number of titles Clubs
 São Paulo 28 Palmeiras (8); Santos (8); São Paulo (6); Corinthians (5); Guarani (1)
 Rio de Janeiro 14 Flamengo (5); Vasco da Gama (4); Fluminense (3); Botafogo (2)
 Rio Grande do Sul 5 Internacional (3); Grêmio (2)
 Minas Gerais 3 Cruzeiro (2); Atlético Mineiro (1)
 Bahia 2 Bahia (2)
 Paraná 2 Atlético Paranaense (1); Coritiba (1)
 Pernambuco 1 Sport Recife (1)

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COPA DO BRASIL

The Copa Kia do Brasil, commonly known as Copa do Brasil (or Brazil Cup), is a knockout competition played by 64 association football teams, representing all 26 Brazilian states plus the Federal District. From 2001 onwards, due to the busy schedule in the first semester in Brazil, teams playing in the Copa Libertadores have not been allowed to participate in the Copa do Brasil in the same year. This has allowed lesser teams to have a shot at the title, since the best clubs are usually playing the continental competition.

Format

The tournament is played in two-legged knockout stages. In the first two rounds the away team automatically goes through to the next round if they beat the home team by a 2-goal difference or more in the first leg.

The away goals rule is used in the Copa do Brasil, which is an unusual feature when compared to other South American competitions. For example, the Copa Libertadores did not adopt this rule until 2005.

Copa do Brasil is an opportunity for teams from smaller states to play against the big teams and episodes of giant-killing have happened at a regular rate throughout the competition history.

The winner automatically qualifies for the next year’s Copa Libertadores, which prevents a team from winning the Copa do Brasil twice in a row.

An unusual fact about the cup is that it is impossible for a team to win it two times in a row, as the defending champions play in the next year’s Copa Libertadores, making impossible for teams to play Copa Libertadores and Copa do Brasil in the same year due to lack of calendar.

Eligible teams

The eligible teams to compete in the Copa do Brasil in 2009 are the ten clubs best-placed in CBF’s ranking, and the 54 best-placed clubs in the state championships, in which the number of spots per state range from one to three clubs.

List of Copa do Brasil winners

Year State Home team Score Away team State Venue Location Refs
1989 Pernambuco PE Sport Recife 0–0 Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul RS Ilha do Retiro Recife, Pernambuco
Rio Grande do Sul RS Grêmio 2–1 Sport Recife Pernambuco PE Estádio Olímpico Monumental Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Grêmio won 3–1 on points.
1990 Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Flamengo 1–0 Goiás Goiás GO Estádio Mário Helênio Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais
Goiás GO Goiás 0–0 Flamengo Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Estádio Serra Dourada Goiânia, Goiás
Flamengo won 3–1 on points.
1991 Rio Grande do Sul RS Grêmio 1–1 Criciúma Santa Catarina (state) SC Estádio Olímpico Monumental Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Santa Catarina (state) SC Criciúma 0–0 Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul RS Estádio Heriberto Hülse Criciúma, Santa Catarina
Tied 2–2 on points, Criciúma won on away goals. ‡
1992 Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Fluminense 2–1 Internacional Rio Grande do Sul RS Estádio das Laranjeiras Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Rio Grande do Sul RS Internacional 1–0 Fluminense Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Estádio Beira-Rio Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Tied 2–2 on points, Internacional won on away goals. ‡
1993 Rio Grande do Sul RS Grêmio 0–0 Cruzeiro Minas Gerais MG Estádio Olímpico Monumental Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Minas Gerais MG Cruzeiro 2–1 Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul RS Mineirão Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
Cruzeiro won 3–1 on points.
1994 Ceará CE Ceará 0–0 Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul RS Castelão Fortaleza, Ceará
Rio Grande do Sul RS Grêmio 1–0 Ceará Ceará CE Estádio Olímpico Monumental Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Grêmio won 3–1 on points.
1995 São Paulo (state) SP Corinthians 2–1 Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul RS Pacaembu São Paulo, São Paulo
Rio Grande do Sul RS Grêmio 0–1 Corinthians São Paulo (state) SP Estádio Olímpico Monumental Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Corinthians won 4–0 on points.
1996 Minas Gerais MG Cruzeiro 1–1 Palmeiras São Paulo (state) SP Mineirão Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
São Paulo (state) SP Palmeiras 1–2 Cruzeiro Minas Gerais MG Estádio Palestra Itália São Paulo, São Paulo
Cruzeiro won 4–1 on points.
1997 Rio Grande do Sul RS Grêmio 0–0 Flamengo Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Estádio Olímpico Monumental Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Flamengo 2–2 Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul RS Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Tied 2–2 on points, Grêmio won on away goals. ‡
1998 Minas Gerais MG Cruzeiro 1–0 Palmeiras São Paulo (state) SP Mineirão Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
São Paulo (state) SP Palmeiras 2–0 Cruzeiro Minas Gerais MG Morumbi São Paulo, São Paulo
Tied 3–3 on points, Palmeiras won on better goal difference. #
1999 Rio Grande do Sul RS Juventude 2–1 Botafogo Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Estádio Alfredo Jaconi Caxias do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul
Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Botafogo 0–0 Juventude Rio Grande do Sul RS Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Juventude won 4–1 on points.
2000 São Paulo (state) SP São Paulo 0–0 Cruzeiro Minas Gerais MG Morumbi São Paulo, São Paulo
Minas Gerais MG Cruzeiro 2–1 São Paulo São Paulo (state) SP Mineirão Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
Cruzeiro won 4–1 on points.
2001 Rio Grande do Sul RS Grêmio 2–2 Corinthians São Paulo (state) SP Estádio Olímpico Monumental Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
São Paulo (state) SP Corinthians 1–3 Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul RS Morumbi São Paulo, São Paulo
Grêmio won 4–1 on points.
2002 São Paulo (state) SP Corinthians 2–1 Brasiliense Brazilian Federal District DF Morumbi São Paulo, São Paulo
Brazilian Federal District DF Brasiliense 1–1 Corinthians São Paulo (state) SP Serejão Taguatinga, Federal District
Corinthians won 4–1 on points.
2003 Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Flamengo 1–1 Cruzeiro Minas Gerais MG Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Minas Gerais MG Cruzeiro 3–1 Flamengo Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Mineirão Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
Cruzeiro won 4–1 on points.
2004 São Paulo (state) SP Santo André 2–2 Flamengo Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Estádio Palestra Itália São Paulo, São Paulo
Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Flamengo 0–2 Santo André São Paulo (state) SP Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Santo André won 4–1 on points.
2005 São Paulo (state) SP Paulista 2–0 Fluminense Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Estádio Jayme Cintra Jundiaí, São Paulo
Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Fluminense 0–0 Paulista São Paulo (state) SP Estádio São Januário Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Paulista won 4–1 on points.
2006 Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Flamengo 2–0 Vasco da Gama Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Vasco da Gama 0–1 Flamengo Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Flamengo won 6–0 on points.
2007 Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Fluminense 1–1 Figueirense Santa Catarina (state) SC Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Santa Catarina (state) SC Figueirense 0–1 Fluminense Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Estádio Orlando Scarpelli Florianópolis, Santa Catarina
Fluminense won 4–1 on points.
2008 São Paulo (state) SP Corinthians 3–1 Sport Recife Pernambuco PE Morumbi São Paulo, São Paulo
Pernambuco PE Sport Recife 2–0 Corinthians São Paulo (state) SP Ilha do Retiro Recife, Pernambuco
Tied 3–3 on points and equal on goal difference, Sport won on away goals. ‡
2009 São Paulo (state) SP Corinthians 2–0 Internacional Rio Grande do Sul RS Pacaembu São Paulo, São Paulo
Rio Grande do Sul RS Internacional 2–2 Corinthians São Paulo (state) SP Estádio Beira-Rio Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul
Corinthians won 4–1 on points.
2010 São Paulo (state) SP Santos 2–0 Vitória Bahia BA Vila Belmiro Santos, São Paulo
Bahia BA Vitória 2–1 Santos São Paulo (state) SP Barradão Salvador, Bahia
Tied 3–3 on points, Santos won better goal difference. #
2011 Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Vasco da Gama 1–0 Coritiba Paraná (state) PR Estádio São Januário Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Paraná (state) PR Coritiba 3–2 Vasco da Gama Rio de Janeiro (state) RJ Couto Pereira Curitiba, Paraná

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COPA AMERICA:

The Copa América (Spanish and Portuguese for “America Cup”)—previously known as South American Championship—is an international football competition contested between the men’s national teams of CONMEBOL, the sport’s continental governing body. It is the oldest international continental football competition.

The current tournament format involves twelve teams competing at venues in a host nation over a period of about a month. The confederation has only ten members, so national teams from other FIFA confederations are invited to fill the other 2 places; Mexico, Costa Rica and the United States have been regular since being invited for the first time in 1993. In 43 tournaments, seven national teams have won the title. Uruguay is the most successful team in the tournament, having won it fifteen times.

The Copa América is one of the world’s most widely viewed sporting events. The highest finishing member of CONMEBOL has the right to participate in the next edition of the FIFA Confederations Cup, but is not obligated to do so.

Beginnings

The first recorded association football match in South America was played in Argentina in 1867 by British railway workers. The first association football team in South America, Gimnasia y Esgrima de La Plata was created in Argentina in 1887, and the Argentine Football Association was founded in 1893. By the early 20th century, football was growing in popularity, and the first international competition held between national teams of the continent occurred in 1910 when Argentina organized an event to commemorate the centenary of the May Revolution. Chile and Uruguay participated, but this event is not considered official by CONMEBOL. Similarly, for the centennial celebration of its independence, Argentina held a tournament between July 2 and July 17 of 1916 with Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Brazil being the first participants of the tournament. This so-called Campeonato Sudamericano de Selecciones would be the first edition of what is currently known as Copa América; Uruguay would triumph in this first edition after tying 0-0 with hosts Argentina in the deciding, last match held in Estadio Racing Club in Avellaneda.

Uruguay won the first two South American Championships, the first held in Buenos Aires in 1916 and the second in 1917, in Montevideo.

Seeing the success of the tournament, a boardmember of the Asociación Uruguaya de Fútbol or Uruguayan Football Association, Héctor Rivadavia, proposed the establishment of a confederation of the associations of Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay, and on July 9, independence day in Argentina, CONMEBOL was founded. The following year, the competition was played again, this time in Uruguay. Uruguay would win the title again to win their bicampeonato after defeating Argentina 1-0 in the last match of the tournament. The success of the tournament on Charrúan soil would help consolidate the tournament. After a flu outbreak in Rio de Janeiro canceled the tournament in 1918, Brazil hosted the tournament in 1919 and was crowned champion for the first time after defeating the defending champions 1-0 in a playoff match to decide the title, while the Chilean city of Viña del Mar would host the 1920 event which was won by Uruguay.

For the 1921 event, Paraguay participated for the first time after its football association affiliated to CONMEBOL earlier that same year. Argentina won the competition for the first time thanks to the goals of Julio Libonatti. In subsequent years, Uruguay would dominate the tournament, which at that time was the largest football tournament in the world. Argentina, however, would not be far behind and disputed the supremacy with the Charruas. After losing the 1928 final at the 1928 Summer Olympics held in Amsterdam, Argentina would gain revenge in the 1929 South American Championship by defeating the Uruguayans in the last, decisive match. During this period, both Bolivia and Peru debuted in the tournament in 1926 and 1927, respectively.

Format and Rules

The tournament was previously known as sup Campeonato Sudamericano de Selecciones (South American Championship of National Teams). South American Championship of Nations was the official English language name. The current name has been used since 1975. Between 1975 and 1983 it had no host nation, and was held in a home and away fashion. The current final tournament features 12 national teams competing over a month in the host nation. There are two stages: the group stage followed by the knockout stage. In the group stage, teams compete within three groups of four teams each. Three teams are seeded, including the hosts, with the other seeded teams selected using a formula based on the FIFA World Rankings. The other teams are assigned to different “pots”, usually based also on the FIFA Rankings, and teams in each pot are drawn at random to the three groups.

Each group plays a round-robin tournament, in which each team is scheduled for three matches against other teams in the same group. The last round of matches of each group is not scheduled at the same time unlike many tournaments around the world. The top two teams from each group advance to the knockout stage as well as the two best third-place teams. Points are used to rank the teams within a group. Beginning in 1995, three points have been awarded for a win, one for a draw and none for a loss (before, winners received two points).

The ranking of each team in each group will be determined as follows:

a) greatest number of points obtained in all group matches;
b) goal difference in all group matches;
c) greatest number of goals scored in all group matches.

If two or more teams are equal on the basis of the above three criteria, their rankings will be determined as follows:

d) greatest number of points obtained in the group matches between the teams concerned;
e) goal difference resulting from the group matches between the teams concerned;
f) greater number of goals scored in all group matches between the teams concerned;
g) drawing of lots by the CONMEBOL Organising Committee (i.e. at random).

The knockout stage is a single-elimination tournament in which teams play each other in one-off matches, with penalty shootouts used to decide the winner if a match is still tied after extra time. It begins with the quarter-finals, then semi-finals, the third-place match (contested by the losing semi-finalists), and the final.

Champion Second Place Third Place
1916  Argentina
Uruguay

Argentina

Brazil

Chile
1917  Uruguay
Uruguay

Argentina

Brazil

Chile
1919  Brazil
Brazil

Uruguay

Argentina

Chile
1920  Chile
Uruguay

Argentina

Brazil

Chile
1921  Argentina
Argentina

Brazil

Uruguay

Paraguay
1922  Brazil
Brazil

Paraguay

Uruguay

Argentina
1923  Uruguay
Uruguay

Argentina

Paraguay

Brazil
1924  Uruguay
Uruguay

Argentina

Paraguay

Chile
1925  Argentina
Argentina

Brazil

Paraguay
N/A
1926  Chile
Uruguay

Argentina

Chile

Paraguay
1927  Peru
Argentina

Uruguay

Peru

Bolivia
1929  Argentina
Argentina

Paraguay

Uruguay

Peru
1935  Peru
Uruguay

Argentina

Peru

Chile
1937  Argentina
Argentina

Brazil

Uruguay

Paraguay
1939  Peru
Peru

Uruguay

Paraguay

Chile
1941  Chile
Argentina

Uruguay

Chile

Peru
1942  Uruguay
Uruguay

Argentina

Brazil

Paraguay
1945  Chile
Argentina

Brazil

Chile

Uruguay
1946  Argentina
Argentina

Brazil

Paraguay

Uruguay
1947  Ecuador
Argentina

Paraguay

Uruguay

Chile
1949  Brazil
Brazil

Paraguay

Peru

Bolivia
1953  Peru
Paraguay

Brazil

Uruguay

Chile
1955  Chile
Argentina

Chile

Peru

Uruguay
1956  Uruguay
Uruguay

Chile

Argentina

Brazil
1957  Peru
Argentina

Brazil

Uruguay

Peru
1959  Argentina
Argentina

Brazil

Paraguay

Peru
1959  Ecuador
Uruguay

Argentina

Brazil

Ecuador
1963  Bolivia
Bolivia

Paraguay

Argentina

Brazil
1967  Uruguay
Uruguay

Argentina

Chile

Paraguay

Copa América era

Year Host Final Third place match
Champion Score Runner-Up Third Place Score Fourth Place
1975 No fixed host
Peru
0 – 1 / 2 – 0
Play-off
1 – 0

Colombia
 Brazil
 Uruguay
N/A
1979 No fixed host
Paraguay
3 – 0 / 0 – 1
Play-off
0 – 0 a.e.t.

Chile
 Brazil
 Peru
N/A
1983 No fixed host
Uruguay
2 – 0 / 1 – 1
Brazil
 Paraguay
 Peru
N/A
1987  Argentina
Uruguay
1 – 0
Chile

Colombia
2 – 1
Argentina
1989  Brazil
Brazil
[E]
Uruguay

Argentina
[E]
Paraguay
1991  Chile
Argentina
[E]
Brazil

Chile
[E]
Colombia
1993  Ecuador
Argentina
2 – 1
Mexico

Colombia
1 – 0
Ecuador
1995  Uruguay
Uruguay
1 – 1
5–3 pens

Brazil

Colombia
4 – 1
United States
1997  Bolivia
Brazil
3 – 1
Bolivia

Mexico
1 – 0
Peru
1999  Paraguay
Brazil
3 – 0
Uruguay

Mexico
2 – 1
Chile
2001  Colombia
Colombia
1 – 0
Mexico

Honduras
2 – 2
5–4 pens

Uruguay
2004  Peru
Brazil
2 – 2
4–2 pens

Argentina

Uruguay
2 – 1
Colombia
2007  Venezuela
Brazil
3 – 0
Argentina

Mexico
3 – 1
Uruguay
2011  Argentina
Uruguay
3 – 0
Paraguay

Peru
4 – 1

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COPA LIBERTADORES:

The Copa Santander Libertadores de América (English: Santander’s American Liberators Cup; Portuguese: Copa Santander Libertadores da América), known simply as the Copa Libertadores and originally known as the Copa Campeones de América (English:American Champions Cup; Portuguese: Copa Campeões da América), is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 1960. It is the most prestigious club competition in South American football and one of the most watched events in the world, broadcast in 135 nations worldwide. The tournament is named in honor of the Libertadores (Portuguese and Spanish for Liberators), the main leaders of the South American wars of independence.

The competition has had several different formats over its lifetime. Initially, only the champions of the South American leagues participated. In 1966, the runners-up of the South American leagues began to join; in 1998, Mexican teams were invited to compete. Today at least three clubs per country compete in the tournament, while Argentina and Brazil each have five clubs participating. Traditionally, a group stage has always been used but the amount of teams per group has varied several times.

The tournament consists of six stages. In the present format, it begins in early February with the first stage. The six surviving teams from the first stage join 26 teams in the second stage, in which there are eight groups consisting of four teams each. The eight group winners and eight runners-up enter the final four stages, better known as the knockout stages, which ends with the finals anywhere between June and August. The winner of the Copa Libertadores becomes eligible to play in two extra tournaments: the FIFA Club World Cup and the Recopa Sudamericana.

Argentine club Independiente is the most successful club in the cup history, having won the tournament seven times. Argentine clubs have accumulated the most amount of victories with 22 wins while Brazil has the largest number of different winning teams, with a total of eight clubs having won the title. The cup has been won by 22 different clubs and won consecutively by six clubs, most recently by Boca Juniors in 2001.

Qualification

As of 2009, most teams qualify to the Copa Libertadores by winning half-year tournaments called the Apertura and Clausura tournaments or by finishing among the top teams in their championship.  The countries that use this format are Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay and Venezuela.  Peru and Ecuador have developed new formats for qualification to the Copa Libertadores involving several stages. Brazil is the only South American league to use a European league format instead of the Apertura and Clausura format. However, one berth for the Copa Libertadores can be won by winning the Copa do Brasil. Peru, Uruguay and Mexico used a second tournament to determine who qualifies to the Libertadores (the “Liguilla Pre-Libertadores” since 1992 to 1997, the “Liguilla Pre-Libertadores de América” since 1974 to 2009, and the InterLiga from 2004 to 2010, respectively). Chile still uses a competition to determine a Copa Libertadores participant, the “Liguilla para Copa Libertadores”. Argentina used an analogous method only once in 1992. Starting in 2011, the winner of the Copa Sudamericana will qualify directly to the following Copa Libertadores.

The competitors of the 2011 edition will be distributed as follows:

  • The defending champion
  • The Copa Sudamericana champion
  • 5 from Argentina and Brazil
  • 3 from Bolivia,Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela each
  • 3 invitees from Mexico

Unlike the nation containing the defending champion, the country of the Copa Sudamericana champion does not gain an extra berth to the tournament.

Rules

Unlike most other competitions around the world, the Copa Libertadores historically did not use extra time or away goals to decide a tie that was level on aggregate.  From 1960 to 1987, two-legged ties were decided on points (teams would be awarded 2 points for a win, 1 point for a draw and 0 points for a loss), without taking goal difference into consideration. If both teams were level on points after two legs, a third match would be played at a neutral site. Goal difference would only come into play if the third match was drawn. If the third match did not produce an immediate winner a penalty shootout was used to determine a winner.

From 1988 onwards, two-legged ties were decided on points, followed by goal difference, with an immediate penalty shootout if the tie was level on aggregate after full time of the second leg.  Starting with the 2005 event, CONMEBOL began to use the away goals rule.  In 2008, the finals became an exception to the away goals rule and employed extra time.

Tournament

The current tournament features 38 clubs competing over a six to eight month period. There are three stages: the first stage, the second stage and the knockout stage.

The first stage pits a number of clubs, currently 12, in series of two-legged knockout ties.  The six survivors join 26 clubs in the second stage, in which they are divided into eight groups of four.  The teams in each group play in a double round-robin format, with each team playing home and away games against each team in their group.  The top two teams from each group are then drawn into the knockout stage, which consists of two-legged knockout ties.  From that point, the competition proceeds with two-legged knockout ties to quarterfinals, semifinals, and the finals.  Between 1960 and 1987 the previous winners did not enter the competition until the semifinal stage, making it much easier to retain the cup.

Between 1960 and 2004, the winner of the tournament participated for the now-defunct Intercontinental Cup.  Since then, the winner plays in the FIFA-organized Club World Cup. The winning team also qualifies to play in the Recopa Sudamericana, a two-legged final series against the winners of the Copa Sudamericana.

El Sueño Libertador

The Sueño Libertador is a promotional Spanish phrase used in the context of winning or attempting to win the Copa Libertadores. Thus, when a team gets eliminated from the competition, it is said that the team has awakened from the liberator dream. The project normally starts after the club win one’s national league (which qualify their winner to compete in the following year’s Copa Libertadores), and the clubs usually spend large sums of money to win the Copa Libertadores.

In 1998 for example, Vasco da Gama spent $10 million to win the competition, and in 1998, Palmeiras, managed by Luiz Felipe Scolari, brought Junior Baiano among other players, and successfully won the 1999 Copa Libertadores. The tournament is highly regarded among its participants. In 2010, players from Chivas de Guadalajara stated that they would rather play the Copa Libertadores final rather than appear on a friendly against Spain, the reigning FIFA World Cup holders who are playing with their best side, and dispute their own national league. Players from Santos FC have stated, after their triumph in the 2010 Copa do Brasil, that they would rather stay in the club and participate in the 2011 Copa Libertadores, despite having multi-million dollar contracts lining up for them from clubs participating in the UEFA Champions League, such as Chelsea of England and Lyon of France.  Oscar Cordoba has stated that the Copa Libertadores was the most important trophy he attained (above the Argentine league, Intercontinental Cup, etc.)

The Historical Table of the Copa Lobertadores can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_Table_of_the_Copa_Libertadores

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COPA RECOPA:

The Recopa Sudamericana (English: South American Winners’ Cup, Recopa, or Cup Winners’ Cup lit. South American Great Cup; Portuguese: Supertaça Sul-Americana) is an annual football match-up between the reigning champions of the previous year’s Copa Libertadores and the Copa Sudamericana, South America’s premier club competitions.

Previously, the Recopa Sudamericana was contested between the Copa Libertadores winner and the Supercopa Sudamericana champion until the Supercopa was disbanded. The competition has been disputed with either a presently-used two-legged series or a single match-up at a neutral venue. Together with the aforementioned tournaments, a club has the chance to win the CONMEBOL Treble all in one year or season.

The most successful team in the competition is Argentine side Boca Juniors, who have won the trophy four times. The cup has been won by 12 different clubs and won consecutively by three clubs; São Paulo, Boca Juniors, and LDU Quito successfully defended the title in 1994, 2006, and 2010, respectively.

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Copa Sudamericana:

The Copa Bridgestone Sudamericana de Clubes (Portuguese: Copa Bridgestone Sul-Americana), known simply as the Copa Sudamericana (Portuguese: Copa Sul-Americana), is an annual international club football competition organized by the CONMEBOL since 2002. It is the second most prestigious club competition in South American football. Despite being organized by CONMEBOL, CONCACAF clubs were invited between 2004 and 2008. Clubs qualify for the competition based on their performance in their national leagues and cup competitions.

The competition began in 2002 after the discontinuation of the Copa Merconorte and Copa Mercosur. Since its introduction, the competition has been a pure elimination tournament with the number of rounds and teams varying from year to year. As of April 2010, 39 teams qualify to the Copa Sudamericana. The tournament has been won by seven different teams and played eight times. The Copa Sudamericana is considered a merger of defunct tournaments such as the Copa CONMEBOL, Copa Mercosur and Copa Merconorte. The winner faces the Copa Libertadores´ champion the following year in the Recopa Sudamericana.

The most successful team in the competition is Argentine side Boca Juniors, who have won the trophy twice. Boca Juniors is also the only team to have successfully defended the title.

History

In 1992, the Copa CONMEBOL was an international football tournament created for South American clubs that did not qualify for the Copa Libertadores and Supercopa Sudamericana. This tournament was discontinued in 1999 and replaced by the Copa Merconorte and Copa Mercosur. These tournaments started in 1998 but were discontinued in 2001. A Pan-American club cup competition was intended, under the name of Copa Pan-Americana, but instead, the Copa Sudamericana was introduced in 2002 as a single-elimination tournament with the reigning Copa Mercosur champion, San Lorenzo. Brazilian clubs did not participate in the 2002 edition due to many conflicting, organizational issues and scheduling conflicts with the Campeonato Brasileiro. San Lorenzo would go on to become the first ever winners of the competition after thrashing Atlético Nacional 4-0 on aggregate.

In 2003, the Japanese automobile manufacturer Nissan Motors started sponsoring the tournament. Thus, the competition has since been officially called Copa Nissan Sudamericana, much in the style of the Copa Libertadores branding as Copa Toyota Libertadores at the time. Also, Brazilian teams participated for the first time.

Juan Sebastián Verón captained Argentine club Estudiantes to the finals of the 2008 Copa Sudamericana.

The 2003 tournament was swept through by the surprising Cienciano as Germán Carty’s goals took los imperiales to the first international title won by a Peruvian club. In the finals, Cienciano managed to hold the powerful River Plate 3-3 in Buenos Aires and managed to come up on top 1-0 on national soil to claim the spoils. After a disappointing 2004 season, Boca Juniors managed to regain some composure as they won the trophy consecutively in 2004 and 2005 defeating Club Bolívar and Pumas de la UNAM, respectively. After the failures of UNAM and Cruz Azul in the 2001 season of the Copa Libertadores, Mexican football finally managed to inscribe themselves in the list of winners of South American club football as Pachuca defeated Colo-Colo, led by two magnificent figures such Matías Fernández and Humberto Suazo. In a highly-charged atmoshere in Santiago’s Estadio Nacional, Suazo brought the home team one up on the scoreboard but two second half goals from Damián Álvarez and Christian Giménez sealed the victory for a highly-spirited team. Their compatriots, Club América, tried to emulate their success but las águilas fell short on the 2007 final as Arsenal won the title thanks to a late and inspirational strike by Martín Andrizzi seven minutes from full time in the second leg.

Having already won the Copa Libertadores and Recopa Sudamericana, Internacional, with goals from Alex and Nilmar, became the first Brazilian team to win the cup, after a near-unbeaten campaign that includes eliminating their archrivals Grêmio, defeating Boca Juniors at the Bombonera, and then defeating Estudiantes in the final. Internacional’s only defeat came in the second leg as they were beaten 0-1 by Estudiantes before extra time took place. In a rematch of the 2008 final of the Copa Libertadores, LDU Quito defeated Fluminense in the finals of the 2009 edition. Just like in their previous triumph, los albos lifted the trophy in the legendary Estádio do Maracanã to earn their third international title in history (as well as their nations). Argentina’s Independiente won the 2010 competition after defeating Goiás of Brazil by penalties in the final.

Qualification

Each national association is assigned a number of entries determined by CONMEBOL and the associations decide how to fill those slots. These can include: performance over the first semester of the year; best teams from previous season that did not qualify for the Copa Libertadores; a qualifying tournament previous to the competition, etc. The tournament itself is played in two-legged knockout stages. In addition, the defending champion receives a bye to the Round of 16. The champion of the Copa Sudamericana is guaranteed a spot in the following year’s Copa Libertadores.

The 2009 Copa Sudamericana Cup on display.

The competitors of the 2010 edition were distributed as follows:

  • The defending champion
  • 8 from Brazil
  • 6 from Argentina
  • 3 from Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela each

Tournament

The tournament starts in the first stage in which a number of clubs, currently 16, are paired in a series of two-legged knockout ties. The eight survivors join 22 clubs in the second stage, in which they are paired again in another series of two-legged knockout ties. The winner then progress to the round of 16, the first of four stage that work on a single elimination phases knockout system that culminates in the finals.

During each stage of the tournament, ties are decided on points, followed by goal difference, away goals, then a penalty shootout after full time of the second leg, if necessary. The exception is the finals, which uses two fifteen-minute extra periods instead of the away goals rule.

Winners

Team Winners Runners-Up Years Won Years Runner-Up
Argentina Boca Juniors 2 0 2004, 2005
Argentina San Lorenzo 1 0 2002
Peru Cienciano 1 0 2003
Mexico Pachuca 1 0 2006
Argentina Arsenal 1 0 2007
Brazil Internacional 1 0 2008
Ecuador LDU Quito 1 0 2009
Argentina Independiente 1 0 2010
Colombia Atlético Nacional 0 1 2002
Argentina River Plate 0 1 2003
Bolivia Bolívar 0 1 2004
Mexico UNAM 0 1 2005
Chile Colo-Colo 0 1 2006
Mexico América 0 1 2007
Argentina Estudiantes 0 1 2008
Brazil Fluminense 0 1 2009
Brazil Goiás 0 1 2010

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ELIMINATORIAS:

The South American zone of 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification sees nine teams competing for places in the finals which are to be held in Brazil.

The format for CONMEBOL’s 2014 World Cup qualifying tournament is identical to the previous four editions. All CONMEBOL national teams will play against each other twice on a home-and-away basis in a single group for 4.5 allotted berths. The top four teams will automatically qualify to the finals. The fifth-placed team will compete in the intercontinental play-offs against the fifth-placed team from the AFC’s World Cup qualifying tournament. The order of matches is identical to that of the 2066 and 2010 tournaments. As Brazil have qualified automatically as hosts, one team will have a bye on the date they would normally be scheduled to play Brazil.

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Source: Wikipedia

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